Spring Poems About Parenting

Spring has officially sprung, and with it comes a new season. A local poet and writer’s day job is also one familiar to many of our readers – the job of Dad. Benjamin Shapiro shares a poetic parenting perspective on worms, rain puddles, and daylight savings time.

Spring Has Sprung

Flower buds burst forth,
Bright explosions of color,
Spring has sprung again.

Not So Fast

We have finally made it through,
The season filled with colds and flu;
Now let’s get out and climb some trees,
Oh crud, forgot about allergies.


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Daylight Savings Time

Parent’s already
Lose plenty of sleep, let us
Make it official.

Rainy Day Play

Playgrounds, trails, and outside play;
The kids want these things everyday,
But, lo, they shall feel such disdain
The moment it begins to rain.
The act of turning on TV,
Leads to outright bickering,
So you tell them to separate,
But they’re bored without playmates,
So invite their friends over,
Three will play while one will hover.
Feed them lunch, hide in your room,
While around the house they zoom.
It’s quiet, you can’t hear a sound;
Suspicious, you go look around.
There they stand at the window,
In awe of a gorgeous rainbow.
Go outside to see it closer,
Stomp in puddles, day almost over.
Send friends home and hug them tight,
Give them a kiss and say goodnight.


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Persephone Comes Home

The goddess dances
Upon fairy-light feet
Twirling under grand old trees,
On top of soft, damp peat.
Flowers bud above her head,
The world turns rich beneath,
She is Spring, Persephone reborn,
Her kiss gives earth new breath.
The dance chaotic brings great joy,
The forest now awakens,
Leaves open their eyes to the bright sun,
Animals are no longer hibernating.
Primavera comes again
Rebirth of the Mother,
Winter’s death has been replaced,
With the life-breath of another.


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A local poet and writer's day job is also one familiar to many of our readers - the job of Dad. Benjamin Shapiro shares a poetic parenting perspective on worms, rain puddles, and daylight savings time.